In the game of crypto, we're all exposed - Tor no exception.


last month
The feds are making some interesting moves in the grand game of crypto-chess. Last month they were warning that our use of crypto was going to impede law enforcement.

But this month we're seeing this:
http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/nsa-worried-th ... te-1516795
http://arstechnica.com/security/2015/05 ... l-servers/
http://arstechnica.com/security/2015/10 ... nnections/

Apparently they are bringing out the boys from the back rooms into the light and the front-room guys realize that we're all naked anyway. So you'll notice that they are going to gradually move us towards slightly better security. They make a big deal about Snowden but in the end there is nothing we can do to stop them anyway.

NSA has a two-fold mission. 1) To collect intelligence about threats to our national security and 2) To help protect our national assets from attack. I am glad to see the guys protecting us are making their voices heard so we can take steps to protect our banks and infrastructure. We individuals should pay attention to what they are saying.

It all comes down to reducing the unknowns. Just like with the crypto systems that power HTTPS are all based on just a handful of prime numbers (instead of a whole lot of them), Tor also really only comes down to a handful of unknowns. They might know your entry point. From there they may or may not know the middle hop. And from the exit node to the server it is all in the clear.

When the number of unknowns is reduced to such a manageable level, the big boys have the advantage.

If you think you can be clever enough to stay out of jail by using Tor, just write to poor Ross in prison and ask his opinion.

My advice is to be careful and do not try to do illegal things in the first place. Whenever you're on the Internet you might as well be writing for the front page of an international newspaper.

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